Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup Gold Plated Metal Sakazuki

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of metal plated with 24 carat gold.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 1.1 inches (2.8 centimeters)
Diameter: 3.6 inches (9.2 centimeters)
Weight: 4.0 ounces (115 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004615
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup – Wood & Lacquer Sakazuki

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  The cups are normally of exceptionally high quality and made of wood with lacquer coatings in red, black and gold though other materials may also be used.  Decoration often consists simply of stylized calligraphy identifying the event the cup was made for along with a few uplifting expressions such as kotobuki (good luck!) and shuku (congratulations!).  Sakazuki sake cups may also include their own storage box with braided binding cord.

About the Listed Item

This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of wood with decorated red lacquer coating on the body.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 0.8 inches (2.0 centimeters)
Diameter: 3.9 inches (10.0 centimeters)
Weight: 0.5 ounces (15 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004612
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup – Wood & Lacquer Sakazuki

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  The cups are normally of exceptionally high quality and made of wood with lacquer coatings in red, black and gold though other materials may also be used.  Decoration often consists simply of stylized calligraphy identifying the event the cup was made for along with a few uplifting expressions such as kotobuki (good luck!) and shuku (congratulations!).  Sakazuki sake cups may also include their own storage box with braided binding cord.

About the Listed Item

This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of wood with red lacquer coating on the body and decorated with Japanese writing.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 1.3 inches (3.4 centimeters)
Diameter: 4.2 inches (10.8 centimeters)
Weight: 0.9 ounces (26 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004611
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup – Wood & Lacquer Sakazuki

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  The cups are normally of exceptionally high quality and made of wood with lacquer coatings in red, black and gold though other materials may also be used.  Decoration often consists simply of stylized calligraphy identifying the event the cup was made for along with a few uplifting expressions such as kotobuki (good luck!) and shuku (congratulations!).  Sakazuki sake cups may also include their own storage box with braided binding cord.

About the Listed Item

This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of wood with red lacquer coating on the body.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 1.1 inches (2.7 centimeters)
Diameter: 3.5 inches (9.0 centimeters)
Weight: 0.6 ounces (17 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004605
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup – Wood & Lacquer Sakazuki

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  The cups are normally of exceptionally high quality and made of wood with lacquer coatings in red, black and gold though other materials may also be used.  Decoration often consists simply of stylized calligraphy identifying the event the cup was made for along with a few uplifting expressions such as kotobuki (good luck!) and shuku (congratulations!).  Sakazuki sake cups may also include their own storage box with braided binding cord.

About the Listed Item

This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of wood with red lacquer coating on the body.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 1.1 inches (2.8 centimeters)
Diameter: 3.3 inches (8.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.5 ounces (15 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004603
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup – Wood & Lacquer Sakazuki

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  The cups are normally of exceptionally high quality and made of wood with lacquer coatings in red, black and gold though other materials may also be used.  Decoration often consists simply of stylized calligraphy identifying the event the cup was made for along with a few uplifting expressions such as kotobuki (good luck!) and shuku (congratulations!).  Sakazuki sake cups may also include their own storage box with braided binding cord.

About the Listed Item

This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of wood with red lacquer coating on the body.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 0.9 inches (2.4 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.7 inches (7.0 centimeters)
Weight: 0.6 ounces (16 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004602
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Japanese Ceremonial Sake Cup – Wood & Lacquer Sakazuki

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sakazuki, Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Sake Cup Guinomi Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Vintage Japanese ceremonial sake cup.  Such cups are called sakazuki in Japan where they are used to commemorate important events such as birthdays, anniversaries and other significant milestones.  The cups are normally of exceptionally high quality and made of wood with lacquer coatings in red, black and gold though other materials may also be used.  Decoration often consists simply of stylized calligraphy identifying the event the cup was made for along with a few uplifting expressions such as kotobuki (good luck!) and shuku (congratulations!).  Sakazuki sake cups may also include their own storage box with braided binding cord.

About the Listed Item

This splendid vintage sakazuki ceremonial sake cup is made of wood with red lacquer coating on the body.  The cup is in good condition with only small marks and scratches from handling and possible past use and dates from the mid to late Japanese Showa period (1926-1989).  The cup was acquired in the historic city of Shizuoka, Japan near the foot of Mt. Fuji.  Click here to see more sake cups!

Size of cup:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Diameter: 2.7 inches (7.0 centimeters)
Weight: 0.5 ounces (13 grams)

Click here to see other sakazuki!
Click
here to see additional sake items!
Click
here to see more treasures from Japan!

More about Japanese sake and sake utensils

Sake has long been an important part of Japanese culture.  In the past, sake was considered a very special item, reserved for only the most important occasions, such as weddings, birth celebrations and other auspicious events.  Sake was considered a sacred drink, and accordingly the first glass poured was always offered to the gods before the remainder could be shared among the celebrants.  Sake can be served either warm or cold and special sake flasks are used to both prepare and dispense this unique Japanese drink.  Sake is warmed either by immersing the flask (already filled with sake of course) into warm water until the desired temperature is reached or through the use of a special sake kettle called a choshi.  The latter method however, though common in old Japan, is today usually reserved for ceremonial events only.  Over time, sake utensils, such as cups have developed their own ritual significance which is still evident in modern Japan.  For example, it is today common at Japanese engagement parties for the man and woman to exchange sake cups as a sign of their mutual intent to marry.  Very beautiful sake cups are also given away to celebrate the birth of a child, as these cherished items are considered symbolic of the significance of the new parent-child relationship.  Though normally small in size, sake cups and flasks have long been used in Japan as a medium for the expression of art and calligraphy.  Hand-painted cups and flasks are highly collectable both within and outside Japan and are eagerly sought after by collectors who value their utilitarian nature and artistic splendor.

item code: R4S2B2-0004601
category code:  SAKECUP
ship code: L1650

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Antique Japanese Pillow – Nihongami Hair Style Makura

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Pillow Makura Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Antique Japanese pillow (makura) for use with women who are wearing a traditional Japanese nihongami hair style (please see last photo in this listing to view an example of this elaborate hair style).  Pillows such as this were designed more for function than comfort as their purpose is to keep the head elevated above the sleeping surface in order to not disturb the woman’s coiffure.

About the Listed Item

This antique Japanese pillow dates from the late 19th or early 20th century and features a wooden frame and delicate neck rest made of thin strips of shaved bamboo.  The pillow is in very poor condition and appears quite worn with marks and scratches and discoloration from age.  The frame pieces are worn from past use and the assembly is quite loose. It seems that someone in the past did try to remedy this problem by securing the frame with cord binding.  This binding does help stabilize the frame though the structure is still quite loose and can easily be moved.  The bamboo neck rest is also quite dry and brittle and the straps are a bit loose.  Due to its age and condition we recommend this item as a display piece only.

Size:
Height: 5.8 inches (14.8 centimeters)
Width (across top): 7.0 inches (18.0 centimeters)
Depth (at base): 3.5 inches (9.0 centimeters)
Weight: 5.7 ounces (162 grams)

Click
here to see more old fashioned Japanese pillows!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

item code: R2S6-0004600
category code: nipponmakura
ship code: G6

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Shinto Shimenawa Rope Japan Kamidana Shogatsu New Year

Kamidana Shinto Jinja Zushi Altar God Kami God Shelf Ofuda Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Kamidana Shinto Jinja Zushi Altar God Kami God Shelf Ofuda Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Kamidana Shinto Jinja Zushi Altar God Kami God Shelf Ofuda Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

 

Note: The above video demonstrates a Japanese farmer making his own Shimenawa for use in his family home at new year. The Shimenawa offered in this listing was not produced by this man.

Description

Small size Japanese Shinto prayer rope with no paper inserts.  These items are called shimenawa and are a common sight at Shinto shrines hanging from the torii shrine gate and above the entrance to the altar.  Shimenawa are made of rice straw which is twisted and braided before being bound with string.  A wood or wire insert is often used to cause the shimenawa to preserve its shape.  Japanese will commonly replace old shimenawa at the start of each year (shogatsu).  Shimenawa were in the past produced in the home by farmers using left over straw from the rice harvest.  The video included with this listing shows a local farmer producing his own shimenawa at new year.

About the Listed Item

This small (please see size information below) shimenawa is suitable for use with kamidana altars, above doorways, or torii gates or anywhere one might wish to impart a sense of spiritual reverence. 

*** Please note that this shimenawa does not include any paper inserts ***

Size (approximate):
Length: 10.5 inches (27 centimeters)
Diameter (at widest end): 1.4 inches (3.5 centimeters)
Weight: 1.1 ounces (32 grams)

Note about buying Japanese Shinto antiques
Many Shinto items such as ofuda, omamori, hamaya and shimenawa are thought to have limited powers which diminish over time.  Japanese people therefore commonly dispose of such items each year in special burning ceremonies called dondoyaki, which are presided over by Shinto priests and performed on the grounds of the shrine.  However, many Shinto items are not burned and may find new life as cherished religious items, sometimes with foreigners practicing Shinto outside Japan.  Many of the Japanese we have discussed this with (including a Shinto priest) have been pleased to learn that old items of their native faith are often well received by Shinto believers abroad.  However, we are sensitive to the fact that some may prefer to see their old Shinto items burned and for this reason we do offer a free disposal service.  Anyone who wishes to have their Shinto items properly destroyed in a dondoyaki ceremony may send the items to us which we will hold and take to our local Shinto shrine for sanctioned disposal.  Please contact us in advance if you wish to use this complementary service and we will provide you with the appropriate mailing address.

Click here to see more Buddhist and Shinto items!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about the Shinto religion

Shinto is one of the two major religions of Japan (the other is Buddhism).  Shinto is often considered to be the native religion of Japan, and is as old as Japan itself.  The name Shinto means “the way of the gods.”  Shinto is a pantheistic religion, in which many thousands of major and minor gods are thought to exist.  The Japanese have built thousands of shrines throughout the country to honor and worship these gods.  Some shrines are huge and are devoted to important deities.  Other shrines are small and may be easily missed when strolling along roads in the countryside (please see the photo below showing our daughter at a very small local shrine near our home in Japan).

Shinto gods are called kamiKami are thought to have influence on human affairs, and for this reason many Japanese make regular pilgrimage to community shrines in order to offer prayers to local kami.  The act of prayer involves approaching the shrine structure, passing through the gate-like torii (red gates in the shrine photos below), cleansing the hands and mouth with water and possibly ascending stairs to the main entrance of the shrine.  Usually without entering the shrine the worshipper will throw some coins into a stone or wooden collection box and then rattle the suzu bell which is at the top of a long hemp rope.  The worshiper grabs hold of the rope and shakes it back and forth causing the copper bell at the top to rattle.  This is thought to get the attention of the shrine god.  The worshipper then bows twice, claps his or her hands twice and then bows again.  In addition, the worshipper may clasp their hands together in silent prayer.  Shintoism and Buddhism have managed to find a comfortable coexistence in Japan.  Evidence of this harmonious relationship is found in the fact that that most Japanese are married in a Shinto shrine, but buried by a Buddhist priest.

item code: R1S3-0004165
ship code: G3

Posted by: softypapa | March 26, 2008

Shinto Shimenawa Rope Japan Kamidana Shogatsu New Year

Kamidana Shinto Jinja Zushi Altar God Kami God Shelf Ofuda Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Kamidana Shinto Jinja Zushi Altar God Kami God Shelf Ofuda Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa

Kamidana Shinto Jinja Zushi Altar God Kami God Shelf Ofuda Japan Japanese Nippon Nihon Tokaido Softypapa 

 

Note: The above video demonstrates a Japanese farmer making his own Shimenawa for use in his family home at new year. The Shimenawa offered in this listing was not produced by this man.

Description

Small size Japanese Shinto prayer rope with no paper inserts.  These items are called shimenawa and are a common sight at Shinto shrines hanging from the torii shrine gate and above the entrance to the altar.  Shimenawa are made of rice straw which is twisted and braided before being bound with string.  A wood or wire insert is often used to cause the shimenawa to preserve its shape.  Japanese will commonly replace old shimenawa at the start of each year (shogatsu).  Shimenawa were in the past produced in the home by farmers using left over straw from the rice harvest.  The video included with this listing shows a local farmer producing his own shimenawa at new year.

About the Listed Item

This small (please see size information below) shimenawa is suitable for use with kamidana altars, above doorways, or torii gates or anywhere one might wish to impart a sense of spiritual reverence. 

*** Please note that this shimenawa does not include any paper inserts ***

Size (approximate):
Length: 9.0 inches (23.0 centimeters)
Diameter (at widest end): 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Weight: 0.8 ounces (24 grams)

Note about buying Japanese Shinto antiques
Many Shinto items such as ofuda, omamori, hamaya and shimenawa are thought to have limited powers which diminish over time.  Japanese people therefore commonly dispose of such items each year in special burning ceremonies called dondoyaki, which are presided over by Shinto priests and performed on the grounds of the shrine.  However, many Shinto items are not burned and may find new life as cherished religious items, sometimes with foreigners practicing Shinto outside Japan.  Many of the Japanese we have discussed this with (including a Shinto priest) have been pleased to learn that old items of their native faith are often well received by Shinto believers abroad.  However, we are sensitive to the fact that some may prefer to see their old Shinto items burned and for this reason we do offer a free disposal service.  Anyone who wishes to have their Shinto items properly destroyed in a dondoyaki ceremony may send the items to us which we will hold and take to our local Shinto shrine for sanctioned disposal.  Please contact us in advance if you wish to use this complementary service and we will provide you with the appropriate mailing address.

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More about the Shinto religion

Shinto is one of the two major religions of Japan (the other is Buddhism).  Shinto is often considered to be the native religion of Japan, and is as old as Japan itself.  The name Shinto means “the way of the gods.”  Shinto is a pantheistic religion, in which many thousands of major and minor gods are thought to exist.  The Japanese have built thousands of shrines throughout the country to honor and worship these gods.  Some shrines are huge and are devoted to important deities.  Other shrines are small and may be easily missed when strolling along roads in the countryside (please see the photo below showing our daughter at a very small local shrine near our home in Japan).

Shinto gods are called kamiKami are thought to have influence on human affairs, and for this reason many Japanese make regular pilgrimage to community shrines in order to offer prayers to local kami.  The act of prayer involves approaching the shrine structure, passing through the gate-like torii (red gates in the shrine photos below), cleansing the hands and mouth with water and possibly ascending stairs to the main entrance of the shrine.  Usually without entering the shrine the worshipper will throw some coins into a stone or wooden collection box and then rattle the suzu bell which is at the top of a long hemp rope.  The worshiper grabs hold of the rope and shakes it back and forth causing the copper bell at the top to rattle.  This is thought to get the attention of the shrine god.  The worshipper then bows twice, claps his or her hands twice and then bows again.  In addition, the worshipper may clasp their hands together in silent prayer.  Shintoism and Buddhism have managed to find a comfortable coexistence in Japan.  Evidence of this harmonious relationship is found in the fact that that most Japanese are married in a Shinto shrine, but buried by a Buddhist priest.

item code: R1S3-0004164
ship code: G3

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