Posted by: softypapa | February 19, 2008

Large Antique Tenjin Statue – Japan Shinto Deity of Scholarship

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa

Tenjin Japanese Shinto Scholarship School Education Deity Japan Tokaido Softypapa 

Description

Large antique wooden Japanese Tenjin statue with wooden base.  Tenjin (aka Tenmangu) is the name used in Japan to describe important and spiritual human beings who are deified after death and who are enshrined in Tenjin Shinto shrines (please read below to learn more about Shinto).  One of the most important types of Tenjin shrines are those devoted to the spirit of Sugawara Michizane (845-903 AD) who is the patron deity of scholarship and calligraphy.  This prominent politician and scholar of the imperial court was banished to a lonely island after being falsely accused of treachery by his jealous peers.  After his death in exile a series of calamities befell the capital which prompted the construction of the first Tenjin shrines in an attempt to appease Michizane’s wronged spirit.  Since that time Michizane Tenjin shrines have become places where students and scholars come to offer their prayers and to seek spiritual aid.  These shrines are particularly busy on January 2nd when many Japanese bring their first calligraphy of the year as an offering and to show their appreciation for received guidance and inspiration.

About the Listed Item

The wonderful antique Tenjin statue offered here is in poor to fair condition with various chips, marks and scratches as well as some fading from exposure and past display.  The paint is coming loose over areas of detail such as the face, hands and along the base so careful handling is in order when transporting or positioning the statue.  This splendid carved wooden figure dates from the Japanese Meiji period (1868-1912) or Taisho period (1912-1926) and includes a fitted wooden base in two sections.  This very large statue is appropriate for use with a religious altar and may have once occupied an honored spot within a Japanese religious temple or shrine.

Size:
Height of statue (approximate excluding base): 9.8 inches (25 centimeters)
Width of statue (approximate at widest point): 13.3 inches (34 centimeters)
Depth of statue (approximate at deepest point): 7.4 inches (19 centimeters)
Width of base (at widest point): 12.7 inches (32.5 centimeters)
Depth of base (at deepest point): 9.6 inches (24.5 centimeters)
Weight: 3.7 pounds (1.7 kilograms)

Click here to see other Tenjin items!
Click
here to see more Shinto items!
Click
here to see religious charms, amulets and talismans!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

More about the Shinto religion

Shinto is one of the two major religions of Japan (the other is Buddhism).  Shinto is often considered to be the native religion of Japan, and is as old as Japan itself.  The name Shinto means “the way of the gods.”  Shinto is a pantheistic religion, in which many thousands of major and minor gods are thought to exist.  The Japanese have built thousands of shrines (jinja) throughout the country to honor and worship these gods.  Some shrines are huge and are devoted to important deities.  Other shrines are small and may be easily missed when strolling along roads in the countryside.

Shinto gods are called kamiKami are thought to have influence on human affairs, and for this reason many Japanese make regular pilgrimage to community shrines in order to offer prayers to local kami.  The act of prayer involves approaching the shrine structure, passing through the gate-like torii, cleansing the hands and mouth with water and possibly ascending stairs to the main entrance of the shrine.  Usually without entering the shrine the worshipper will throw some coins into a stone or wooden collection box and then rattle the suzu bell which is at the top of a long hemp rope.  The worshiper grabs hold of the rope and shakes it back and forth causing the copper bell at the top to rattle.  This is thought to get the attention of the shrine god.  The worshipper then bows twice, claps his or her hands twice and then bows again.  In addition, the worshipper may clasp their hands together in silent prayer.  Shintoism and Buddhism have managed to find a comfortable coexistence in Japan.  Evidence of this harmonious relationship is found in the fact that that most Japanese are married in a Shinto shrine, but buried by a Buddhist priest.

item code: R1S1-0004044
ship code: D or appropriate

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: