Posted by: softypapa | December 5, 2007

Carved Wooden Stamp for Making Japan Woodblock Print

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese

Carved Wooden Stamp Making Japan Woodblock Print Tokaido Softypapa Japanese 

Description

Authentic antique Japanese carved stamp used to create a small area of woodblock printed text.  The art of Japanese woodblock printing is famous and well known throughout the world and was used in Japan to create simple black ink as well as full color images of art and written text.  Most woodblock prints were produced during the Japanese feudal era by dedicated publishing houses employing skilled writers, artists, wood carvers and woodblock printing facilities.  A single print could be produced many times over until interest in the title waned or until the carved wooden blocks used to make the images began to wear and the quality of the impressions failed.  Publishing houses hired talented writers and artists to create the images and writing which was used as the subject of a print.  The draft text and any illustrations would normally need to be approved by the Shogun’s (military leader of Japan) official censors and receive a censorship stamp before proceeding to production.  Once approved, talented carvers would set to work carving the book’s illustrations and text into special wooden blocks which would then be used to make multiple impressions.  Several blocks might be required for each page depending upon the number of colors to be applied.  Black and white pages needed only a single block while additional blocks were necessary for each and every color thereafter.  Individual prints were popular while complete books were also produced which were bound with thread or opened accordion-style.  This unique technology was also used to create special blocks with handles for use in making forms and script for use in business.  These woodblock printing tools were employed in the same way that modern day rubber stamps are used.

About the Listed Item

Antique carved wooden stamp used to produce printed Japanese text and artistic decorative images.  This authentic old stamp was carefully hand-carved by a very skilled craftsman who was able to duplicate complicated hentai kana (script-like) Japanese characters in reverse on a solid block of wood.  This is no small feat as the final carving must produce text resembling that which is produced by the flowing hand of a skilled calligrapher.  The carver has no room for error as a single accidental cut or chip would ruin the entire work.  This wonderful old stamp is in fair condition with no cracks though it does have some chips, marks and wear from handling and past use.  The stamping surface is black due to the ink used during printing and tape is stuck to the back of the stamp.  This stamp dates from the early to mid Japanese Showa period (1926-1989) or before.

Size:
Height: 1.0 inches (2.5 centimeters)
Length: 3.9 inches (10.0 centimeters)
Width: 3.8 inches (9.8 centimeters)
Weight: 4.1 ounce 118 grams)

Click
here to see more woodblock print items!
Click
here to see additional treasures from Japan!

item code: R3S4B5-0003412
ship code: L1650

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Responses

  1. hi i am raja from pakistan i am wood block meker …..

  2. this is my wood block youer block and my block wook is a sam..

    • Hi raja,
      I am looking for a woodblock maker. I love this japanese woodblock stamp. Where can I see your work.


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